Comment

Big data and digital methods in science communication research: opportunities, challenges and limits

21/06/2017

Abstract: 

Computational social science represents an interdisciplinary approach to the study of reality based on advanced computer tools. From economics to political science, from journalism to sociology, digital approaches and techniques for the analysis and management of large quantities of data have now been adopted in several disciplines. The papers in this JCOM commentary focus on the use of such approaches and techniques in the research on science communication. As the papers point out, the most significant advantages of a computational approach in this sector include the chance to open up a range of new research opportunities: from the study of technical and scientific controversies to citizen science, from the definition of new norms and practices for science journalism to open science issues. On the other hand, difficulties are shared with other areas of application. The main risk is that the large quantity of data available can overwhelm the importance of theory. Instead, as the papers in this commentary demonstrate, big data should push scientists to pursue a deeper epistemological and methodological reflection also in the research on science communication.

Authors: 

Documents: 

21/06/2017

Social media is restructuring the dynamics of science communication processes inside and outside the scientific world.

21/06/2017

Although with some reluctance, social sciences now seem to have accepted the challenge deriving from the growing digitisation of communication and the con

21/06/2017

Thanks, on the one hand, to the extraordinary availability of colossal textual archives and, on the other hand, to advances in computational possibilities

21/06/2017

This article examines certain guiding tenets of science journalism in the era of big data by focusing on its engagement with citizen science.

21/06/2017

Online visual communication of science focuses on interactive sharing and participatory collaboration rather than simple knowledge dissemination.