Personal tools
Home Archive volume 09, 2010 Issue 01, march 2010. Special issue Open science: policy implications for the evolving phenomenon of user-led scientific innovation
Document Actions

Open science: policy implications for the evolving phenomenon of user-led scientific innovation

22/03/2010

Abstract

From contributions of astronomy data and DNA sequences to disease treatment research, scientific activity by non-scientists is a real and emergent phenomenon, and raising policy questions. This involvement in science can be understood as an issue of access to publications, code, and data that facilitates public engagement in the research process, thus appropriate policy to support the associated welfare enhancing benefits is essential. Current legal barriers to citizen participation can be alleviated by scientists’ use of the “Reproducible Research Standard,” thus making the literature, data, and code associated with scientific results accessible. The enterprise of science is undergoing deep and fundamental changes, particularly in how scientists obtain results and share their work: the promise of open research dissemination held by the Internet is gradually being fulfilled by scientists. Contributions to science from beyond the ivory tower are forcing a rethinking of traditional models of knowledge generation, evaluation, and communication. The notion of a scientific “peer” is blurred with the advent of lay contributions to science raising questions regarding the concepts of peer-review and recognition. New collaborative models are emerging around both open scientific software and the generation of scientific discoveries that bear a similarity to open innovation models in other settings. Public engagement in science can be understood as an issue of access to knowledge for public involvement in the research process, facilitated by appropriate policy to support the welfare enhancing benefits deriving from citizen-science.

download

Editorials Articles Comments Reviews Letters Focus
2014 Conference
2014 Conference

New Program
Master Classes
Framing engagement: expert-youth interaction in a PES event Sampsa Saikkonen, Esa Valiverronen 08/04/2014
Narrative as a learning tool in science centers: potentials, possibilities and merits Mai Murmann, Lucy Avraamidou 02/04/2014
Examining perceptions of astronomy images across mobile platforms Lisa F. Smith, Kimberly K. Arcand, Jeffrey K. Smith, Randall K. Smith, Jay Bookbinder, Megan Watzke 25/03/2014
Communicating evolution with a Dynamic Evolutionary Map Sonia H. Stephens 13/03/2014
All articles…
Museums for Science Education: can we make the difference? The case of the EST project Maria Xanthoudaki, Brunella Tirelli, Patrizia Cerutti, Sara Calcagnini 21/06/2007
Changing the meaning of peer-to-peer? Exploring online comment spaces as sites of negotiated expertise Marie-Claire Shanahan 22/02/2010
Science comics as tools for science education and communication: a brief, exploratory study M. Tatalovic 18/11/2009